Centre_Block_-_Parliament_Hill

Three different bills have been introduced in Canada’s Parliament to end horse slaughter and the live exports of horses for slaughter.

In June 2010 MP Alex Atamanenko (NDP Agriculture Critic) tabled Bill C-544, an Act that would effectively have ended the transport of horses and horse meat for human consumption. The bill did not proceed due to a federal election being called.

Then, in October 2011, MP Atamanenko re-introduced the bill as Bill C-322.  The language in Bill C-322 was reworked with Bill C-322 being withdrawn and replaced by Bill C-571.  This link explains this change.

Bill C-571 made it through to a first vote in Parliament and was well supported by both the Liberal and NDP Members of Parliament.  Sadly, with the exception of two MPs, the Conservative party, who had a majority at the time, voted against the bill and it did not go forward.

Canada's new Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (bottom row C) poses with his cabinet after their swearing-in ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa November 4, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Wattie - RTX1URF7

Canada’s new Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (bottom row C) poses with his cabinet after their swearing-in ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa November 4, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Wattie – RTX1URF7

As of November 2015, Canada has a new Liberal majority government.  This change will ensure that the CHDC will once again work on having another Bill readied in the near future.

Grassroots support from you will be critical to the enactment of any legislation. In order to help create legislation, you need to communicate with your Member of Parliament to inform them of the issues and to make your opinions known. By presenting petitions, you provide evidence of support from your community. Please see our Do It Now page for actions you can take to help!

To have an understanding of how business is conducted in Canadian Parliament, please see the following link from the Canadian House of Commons website:

Legislative Process

Summary: In the Parliament of Canada, as in all legislative assemblies based on the British model, there is a clearly defined method for enacting legislation. A bill must go through a number of specific stages in the House of Commons and the Senate before it becomes law:

notice of motion for leave to introduce and placement on Order Paper;
preparation of a bill by a committee (where applicable);
introduction and first reading;
reference to a committee before second reading (where applicable);
second reading and reference to a committee;
consideration in committee;
report stage;
third reading (and passage);
consideration and passage by the Senate;
passage of Senate amendments by the Commons (where applicable);
Royal Assent, and
coming into force.

As you can see, it is an involved process, however, the information provided with these links can help give a better understanding of how the process works:

Parliamentary Procedure
Private Members’ Business
Private Membersʼ Bills, Notice, Introduction and First Reading
Presenting Petitions
Petition Guidelines
Government Responses to Petitions